mercoledì, luglio 01, 2015

 

ISIS Unlikely to Be Defeated Soon, Boding ill for Iraqi Christians


The recent military success of the Islamic State group in conquering Ramadi and in attacking Iraqi forces elsewhere in northwestern Iraq as well as making gains in Syria reminds us that ISIS remains a disciplined, coherent fighting force—not soon to be defeated or disappear.  This is not good news for the Christians of Iraq. 
The demonstrated military and administrative capacity of ISIS, which proclaimed a worldwide caliphate this time last year, will hamper efforts to recover Mosul from ISIS control and to allow for the return of internally displaced persons (IDPs) and refugees, in particular Christians from the southern Nineveh Plain region and the areas west and southwest of Mosul.  For those Christians who have sought refuge outside of their ancestral home region, it will likely be several years before the security situation improves enough with the eradication of ISIS and re-establishment of stable government authority to allow for their return home.  Plans for retaking Mosul have already been pushed back, and the flow of funds and fighters to ISIS has not been reduced sufficiently to force a broad near term retreat of ISIS forces.  We must reconcile ourselves to the prospect of a years-long struggle against ISIS accompanied by a steady flow of reports of atrocities committed by them in support of installing a Caliphate that accords with ISIS’ violence-laden interpretation of the Quran.
Much has been written about the fault of the Iraqi forces in defending Ramadi. But that ignores the fact that they held out for 18 months against the besieging ISIS forces.
Far less has been written about what we can learn from the success of the ISIS forces.  They demonstrated resolve and innovation in tactics, taking advantage of the cover provided by blinding sandstorms to infiltrate the city and surprise the Iraqi security forces there.  (Scenes towards the end of the film American Sniper depict the blinding type of sandstorm quite well.)  At the same time ISIS was conquering Ramadi, it was pursuing objectives in Syria, effectively fighting on two fronts, or at least in two areas of operations, at the same time.  The successful management of the logistics and personnel to pursue two military operations almost simultaneously, even though it did not involve massive numbers of troops and equipment, reveals that ISIS has created the organization and governing structures one associates with a modern state.  Even when Ramadi is retaken by Iraqi forces with the help of the anti-ISIS Coalition, the Islamic State group will remain a potent threat in western and northwestern Iraq, precluding the large scale return of those forced out by its onslaughts. 
Some of those living under ISIS control report that it collects taxes, enforces laws and regulations, administers “justice” (dispenses punishment to those convicted of an offense), and provides social services to its subjects.  In some cases it appears it has allowed Christians to stay as long as they pay the jizya (the tax imposed on non-Muslims in an Islamic state) and do not resist ISIS control.  If true, this is another example that ISIS is behaving like an Islamic state, not a terrorist organization. 
This does not bode well for the Christian refugees, for states tend to maintain themselves and their control of others longer than do terrorists groups.  ISIS in Ramadi and elsewhere soon will face Iraqi counterattacks, likely leading to its loss of control of Ramadi and some other areas, but it will take many successful counterattacks over several years to destroy its administrative structures on the ground as well as in cyberspace. 
Once ISIS is defeated militarily and its effective control of parts of Iraq is ended, it is unlikely Christians forced out of their homes will rush to return.  Many will have moved out of the region permanently, joining their communities’ diasporas in Europe, the Americas or Australia.  Others will long hesitate to return, preferring refugee status to living in their ancestral homeland in fear of a resurgence of ISIS or facing anti-Christian attacks from ISIS sympathizers.  Those who do return soon after ISIS is eliminated from Iraq will find homes destroyed or occupied by others, churches demolished or converted into mosques or for commercial use, and businesses destroyed or handed over to others.  Restitution will be a long and expensive process, if it ever takes place.  Returned refugees are likely to face an unwelcoming attitude, for the Iraqi Sunnis who embraced or at least did not oppose the rise of ISIS will not rejoice at the return of those whom they formerly tolerated but did not protect and from whom they acquired abandoned homes and businesses.  Few Iraqi Sunnis actually materially support ISIS or harbor hatred for the Christians (formerly) in their midst, but ISIS has had success in creating the impression among many Iraqi Sunnis that it defends them against the Shi’a-dominated government that they feel has oppressed them, instilling a widespread sense of distrust that and making the re-creation of a mutually tolerant multi-communal Iraq difficult.  For Christians in Iraq, this is somewhat of a change in fortunes, for the Sunni-based regime of Saddam Hussein did not single out Iraqi Christians for special mistreatment and even included a few Christians in government. 
While the ISIS success in Ramadi may be reversed soon by Iraqi and anti-ISIS Coalition forces, a necessary condition before embarking on the campaign for Mosul and the surrounding region, the taking of Ramadi by ISIS revealed that it will not be easily dislodged from its conquests and that restoring the Christian population displaced from their homeland of two millennia will require several years of military efforts aided subsequently by political courage and the good will of Iraq’s religious leaders. 

Ed Stafford is a U.S. foreign service officer currently teaching at the Inter-American Defense College. He served at the U.S. Embassy in Iraq from 2007 to 2008. The views expressed in this article are his own and do not necessarily represent the views of the IADC, the U.S. Department of State, or the U.S. government.
 

Leggi tutto!
 

Iraqi priest tells West: ‘Wake up over IS’


Iraqi priest Fr Douglas Bazi, who takes care of thousands of refugees forced to flee Mosul after Islamic State took over the city last year, has a simple but pointed message for Western Europe: "Wake up!"
Fr Bazi, once a torture victim, was in Gozo yesterday to celebrate the feast of St Peter and St Paul on the invitation of Nadur archpriest Mgr Jimmy Xerri.
"We cannot celebrate the feast of two martyrs without remembering the living martyrs of our time," Fr Xerri said.
Fr Bazi believes not enough is being done to support the thousands of persecuted Christians.
Exactly a year has passed since Islamist insurgents had issued an ultimatum to Christians remaining in northern Iraq's city of Mosul: either convert to Islam or pay the jizya tax (a per capita tax on non-Muslims revived by IS) or face death.
This led to an exodus of more than 120,000 Christians, who flooded the towns of Kurdistan in the scorching summer heat.
Fr Bazi, 43, says IS (also known as Isis) forced the Christians to leave with just the clothes on their back. Multiple checkpoints ensured they were stripped of their money, passports and even their wedding rings.
His own story of suffering means he can look these people in the eye. Back in 2006, he was kidnapped in Baghdad and held for nine days, during which he was tortured and beaten.

Leggi tutto!
 

Iraq: a Erbil sta nascendo la "Lega dei Caldei"


Inizia oggi a Erbil, e si protrae fino al 3 luglio, la Conferenza internazionale di fondazione della “Lega dei Caldei”, organismo fortemente voluto dal patriarca caldeo Louis Sako come strumento votato ad affrontare le problematiche politiche e sociali che coinvolgono le comunità caldee in tutto il mondo. Alla Conferenza fondativa, oltre al patriarca, partecipano rappresentanti delle comunità caldee provenienti da tutto il mondo, insieme ai vescovi caldei dell'Iraq e ad altri vescovi caldei venuti dall'estero, come il gesuita siriano Antoine Audo, vescovo caldeo di Aleppo. All'ordine del giorno, l'approvazione definitiva dei regolamenti dell'associazione e la creazione degli organismi interni. Al termine della Conferenza verrà diffusa una dichiarazione finale per riassumere finalità e campi d'azione della nuova organizzazione.

Un'associazione per rappresentare le istanze dei caldei nella società civile
L'intento dell'associazione è soprattutto quello di coinvolgere professionisti, intellettuali ed esperti competenti nelle varie discipline per rappresentare in maniera coordinata e organica le istanze della comunità caldea nella società civile, a livello locale e internazionale. In un momento delicato come quello presente, in cui la stessa unità nazionale irachena è messa in discussione da spinte centrifughe di ogni genere, l'associazione si propone di consolidare i fondamenti della coesistenza e nel contempo difendere i diritti dei caldei, ponendosi anche come “strumento di pressione” sui processi decisionali che condizionano la convivenza civile.

Una Lega indipendente  rispetto a sigle e partiti politici
La nuova organizzazione potrà partecipare con propri rappresentanti ai forum internazionali e dovrà mantenere un profilo indipendente rispetto a sigle e partiti politici. Le risorse finanziarie dovranno provenire soltanto da donazioni private e dalla raccolta delle quote d'iscrizione. Nel febbraio 2014 era stato lo stesso patriarca caldeo Louis Sako a lanciare il progetto di un'associazione concepita come strumento per favorire il contributo dei caldei alla società civile e aiutare l'Iraq a vincere le derive del settarismo confessionale e etnico.
 

Leggi tutto!

martedì, giugno 30, 2015

 

Fighting for the ruins of Christian Iraq

By CNN
Andrew Doran *

Safaa Elias Jajo, a Chaldean man in his 40s, stands in the wreckage of a home in Telskuf in Iraq's Nineveh province. The home served as ISIS headquarters in this area until a U.S.-led coalition airstrike leveled it last year.
Above Jajo, a ceiling fan sags downward, melted and charred; at his feet is an expended ISIS rocket that was fired into the home after the terror group's retreat. A calendar, its edges seared by explosions, bears an iconic rendering of the Visitation -- the only sign that it was once a Christian home.
Telskuf is Jajo's home and, until 2014, was a town of 12,000 Christians. He was the last Christian to leave when ISIS advanced here last year and was the first to return when ISIS was driven back toward Mosul.
He stands in silence, flanked by a young Christian soldier holding a Kalashnikov. Jajo, from a prominent local family, served in Saddam Hussein's army two decades ago. He is an obvious choice to lead the local Nineveh Plains Forces, one of several Christian militias in northern Iraq.
In Telskuf, there are no signs of life. The grass is overgrown; houses are leveled. Jajo points to a home: "ISIS called the owner of this home," who had fled, "and told him they would be cooking there."
Jajo has spoken to some of his neighbors who have already left Iraq, pleading with them to return.
"They will not return until it is liberated." He and his men hope to play a part in that liberation.
"There are approximately 500 of us," Jajo says of his unit. Beyond the small force here (perhaps a dozen), the rest are scattered across Nineveh and Kurdistan. They operate under the auspices of the Kurdistan Regional Government and its militia, the Peshmerga.
That status, however, is more theoretical than practical: Jajo has been waiting months for the Ministry of the Peshmerga to process his commission. His frustration is palpable, though he and the local Peshmerga soldiers, one of whom is present, appear to be on good terms.
Like the substantially larger Peshmerga, Christian militias are tied to political parties. The swift ISIS gains in Iraq last year led to greater political unity among rival Kurdish factions, which in turn led to greater cooperation among Peshmerga units.
For the Christians, however, divisions remain. There is no single Christian militia and no consensus among Christians on their military or political role here. Jajo sees hope for Christians within the framework of Kurdistan, rather than the Iraqi central government.
Like others, he looks to language in the KRG Constitution that calls for "special autonomy" for minorities. Jajo also asks for help from the United States and the West. "We need support and we need it quickly. We want to fight."
The Peshmerga have made the same request. The problem is that U.S. law forbids the shipment of weapons to any but a lawful government, so weapons must come from Baghdad.
For their part, the Kurds would prefer that Christians serve in the Peshmerga -- a reasonable proposition on its face. A small number of Christians do, while others train to protect Nineveh after its liberation from ISIS.
Jajo is keen that they should get combat experience now, fighting alongside the Peshmerga. "We have asked for the opportunity to serve at the front" -- just to the south -- "but we've not been given the opportunity."
Farther to the south, beyond the trenches defended by the Peshmerga and a no-man's land, are ISIS and the soldiers of the caliphate. "If there is a plan to liberate Christian areas, we want to be a part of it," Jajo says.
While no offensive operations appear imminent, his point is more than sentiment: To have an equal claim to a future Kurdistan and Nineveh, Christians should be a part of its liberation.
Jajo acknowledges that he has recruited "maybe 30 or 40" men from the tens of thousands of Christians living in Ankawa, a district on the north end of Irbil. Many Christians fled to Ankawa from Baghdad and elsewhere in Iraq after the 2003 invasion.
Most recent arrivals are from the cities and villages of Nineveh -- many of them using Ankawa as a staging area before moving on to Europe, North America or Australia.
"This is the biggest problem," he says. "Just from Telskuf, 670 families are now in other countries. The only solution is liberating Nineveh."
That is unlikely to happen soon. The Kurds lack the firepower and training, and are more accustomed to defensive warfare -- an inclination well-suited to the current military situation, trench warfare. The Iraqi military, despite being better equipped than ISIS or the Peshmerga, has proved to be the least effective of the three.
The United States is unlikely to put troops on the ground, viewing the situation as a problem for Iraqis to sort out. The casualties that would result from urban fighting to drive ISIS out of Mosul are more than the Kurds, the Iraqi military or the United States are prepared to suffer.
A sustained bombing campaign in Mosul, which would claim numerous civilian casualties, is still less likely. And so Mosul will likely remain an ISIS stronghold for the foreseeable future.
The Christians of Telskuf and elsewhere in Iraq have been failed -- by the U.S. government, which did not protect them after the 2003 invasion; by the government in Baghdad, which failed to give Christians an equal status; by their political leaders, in Iraq and the West, who have been sidetracked by rivalries and arcane squabbles rather than seeking unity through compromise.
Some Christians here, while acknowledging a preference for Kurdistan over Baghdad's government, believe that the Christians are being used as a political pawn by the Kurds to curry favor with Western governments. Time will tell, especially as support for Kurdish independence swells.
Jajo poses for a photograph with his troops, Christian men in their 20s. They have been through basic training and have weapons, but are untested. In their faces one sees a mix of courage, fear, intensity and frustration.
Unlike the Peshmerga, the Christians of this region have no meaningful tradition of military service. It might be tempting for observers to dismiss their presence.
"They could easily be in Ankawa," an American translator says. "But they're not. They're here." He admires their courage. Few though they are, they are likely to remain here.
The status of Christians in Iraqi Kurdistan will be much discussed in the months ahead. Politicians reluctant to endorse openly a Kurdistan inching toward independence will be still more reluctant to press for the rights of minorities within that uncertain framework.
In the meantime, many of Nineveh's towns remain occupied by ISIS or deserted altogether.
Telskuf may offer a glimpse of Christianity's future in Iraq: ISIS driven back, a Christian town deserted and a handful of Christians standing amid the ruins, determined that Christianity here will not be extinguished.
* Andrew Doran is founder of In Defense of Christians and was on the executive secretariat of the U.S. National Commission for UNESCO at the U.S. State Department. The views expressed in this column belong to Doran.

Leggi tutto!
 

'The unthinkable is real,' author warns about persecutions of Middle East Christians

By Catholic News Agency
Gabrielle Cubera

Growing unrest in the Middle East is causing great concern for the Christian community around the world, and author George J. Marlin is hoping to enlighten Western Christians on how seriously matters are progressing, as their brethren in the Middle East continue to undergo persecution.
His latest book, Christian Persecutions in the Middle East: A 21st Century Tragedy, was published earlier this month by St. Augustine's Press, and details the rise of radical Islamism and its impact on Christians throughout the Middle East.

“Western civilization was built on Christianity which, sadly enough, is being forgotten for Western Europe, and even in this nation here,” Marlin told CNA.

“I think the Church’s job is to remind the West that its civilization was based on the concept that man is a creature made in the image and likeness of God, and therefore is entitled by his very nature … basic rights, including the freedom to practice one’s religion.” 

Marlin is chairman of Aid to the Church in Need- USA, a Catholic charity under the guidance of the Pope that supports and aids the persecuted and suffering Church around the world. Last year, Aid to the Church in Need raised $100 million internationally.

As chairman, Marlin is given information daily about struggling Christians around the world, particularly in the Middle East.

“I’ve been able to see and speak firsthand to bishops and archbishops in the area, and other people who are often persecuted in the area,” Marlin said.

Marlin says that for the Christians, their “most daunting task is to survive.”   

“They’re concerned about survival, they’re concerned about getting three meals a day, they’re hoping they can educate their kids someday. They’re hoping they can come back to their home.”

“More importantly, we have to keep in mind that these Christians are beginning to feel abandoned by the Christian world because, although the Pope has come out and made some statements, Cardinal Dolan of New York has made some statements … in the Western media, a lot of this is being ignored,” Marlin stated. 

The book examines the history of both Christianity and Islam in the Middle East; followed by an in-depth look at eight countries in the region where Christians are particularly persecuted; it then includes perspectives of various experts from the region.

“It’s eye-opening for me as I am talking right now to so many other Americans that they’re shocked to learn that there are Christians in the Middle East,” Marlin stated.  “So I thought it was important to take this data and put together a story of what exactly is happening in Middle East at this point in time.”

He added that Christians can often regard only Europe as historically Christians, and “sometimes forget that the first center [of the Church] was in Antioch, Syria before St Peter moved it to Rome, and so the apostles and early martyrs of the Church were in the Middle East.”

Marlin said that it is important for people to realize that even before the Islamic State “came on the scene two years ago,” the 21st century has continually experienced “systemic persecution of Christians.”

Marlin’s hope is that the book, as well as the work of Aid to the Church in Need, “jolts the conscience of the West, because too many people in Europe and in the United States have their head in the sand trying to ignore this problem here.” 

Marlin emphasized that persecution isn't restricted to the brutal, attention-grabbing ways the Islamic State uses to execute its captives. Christians in the Middle East are also persecuted through pressure to convert, employment and education discrimination, church bombings, murder, destruction of homes and businesses, kidnapping, and being treated as second-class citizens.
 
Documents and manuscripts dating back thousands of years have also been destroyed. “We have Christians being driven out, they may never come back,” Marlin stated. “We have the institutional Church being destroyed, and we have the patrimony of the Church being destroyed.”
“These same tactics are used in these countries and are profiled in this book,” Marlin said. “It’s going on every day and it has been going on throughout this century and obviously centuries before this. It’s time, I’m hoping, that people begin to catch on, particularly the Christians in the United States.”

An example he gave was the Chaldean Archeparchy of Mosul: in 2004, a year after the US invasion of Iraq, it had 20,600 members. By 2013 the number had dropped to 14,100, and last summer, most of the remaining Christians in the city and its environs fled before the Islamic State.

In January, its bishop, Amel Nona, was transferred to the Chaldean eparchy for Australia, leaving the Mosul archeparchy vacant, perhaps fated to become a titular see.

Marlin suggested that in light of the scale of persecution faced by many Christians in the Middle East, “the President of the United States to appoint a special Middle East envoy just to deal with these Christian persecutions.” He also raised the possibility of economic sanctions, and denying foreign aid to countries who persecute their citizens.

He said that the only way groups such as the Islamic State “are going to be put out of business is if modern Islam stands up and says 'this is wrong'. These radical groups, if they are not tamed, if they are not destroyed or eliminated, they may destroy the Christian presence in the Middle East.”

Marlin's book concludes with an epilogue and an appendix that provides important documents pertaining to the persecution of Christians, including addresses from Pope Francis, Benedict XVI, and Cardinal Timothy Dolan of New York.

Leggi tutto!
 

Assyrian teen terrified of ISIS seeks asylum after surgery in Sacramento

By Kcra
Dana Griffin

A teenage girl from Iraq, receiving medical treatment in Sacramento, may be forced to return home to an ISIS-occupied village because her temporary visa is set to expire.
Soyana Isaac Israel, 17, and her mom are in Northern California to fix a botched childhood leg surgery performed by a doctor in Northern Iraq, which left the girl in a wheelchair.

Through an interpreter, Shimshon Antal, Israel said, "I thank very much all the doctors and all the people who brought us here."
With the help of the Assyrian Medical Society, she's undergone three surgeries at Shriners Hospital. The final surgery is planned for November, but once therapy ends, so will her time in the U.S.
"I am afraid to go back," Israel said.
If she returns home, she believes her life will be in danger.
Israel's entire family is Assyrian Christian, and the family's church has been burned to the ground. The relatives fled north of the village and are living in a church basement.
It's emotional for her mom, because considering the teen's age and beauty, she would be a commodity for ISIS to kidnap and sell at a higher price.
As the family works through the legal system to seek asylum, it continues to pray for help and support from the government.
"She's very thankful to be in the United States and she's begging anybody who can help them stay here," Antal said.
There's no word on if her father and four sisters would be allowed to leave Iraq.
The Assyrian Medical Society relies heavily on donations to help children get the medical treatment they need.


Leggi tutto!

lunedì, giugno 29, 2015

 

Quale intervento per salvare i profughi

Angelo Scola *  

Caro direttore, era il primo giorno di Ramadan dell’anno scorso (29 giugno) quando l’Isis proclamava il califfato. Il venerdì successivo, al-Baghdadi si mostrava in pubblico nella grande moschea di Mosul e nei mesi successivi si compiva la cacciata dei cristiani dai villaggi della piana di Ninive, il massacro degli yazidi e l’espansione jihadista in Iraq e Siria.
Una coincidenza ha voluto che proprio nel primo venerdì di Ramadan, quindi a un anno esatto (secondo il calendario islamico) dalla prima apparizione pubblica del «neo-califfo», visitassi brevemente i campi profughi allestiti a Erbil, capitale del Kurdistan iracheno, su invito dei Patriarchi Bechara Raï, libanese, e Louis Sako, iracheno. I sentimenti tra i sacerdoti e gli operatori oscillavano tra la rabbia e l’esasperazione. Le priorità della guerra si sono spostate altrove e la riconquista di Mosul e della piana di Ninive è stata rinviata a data da destinarsi. Nel frattempo sono 125 mila i rifugiati cristiani in Kurdistan — una parte soltanto dello sterminato popolo degli sfollati — e anche se qualche progresso è stato fatto, come la riduzione delle tendopoli da 26 a 7, le condizioni, nei vari campi profughi, rimangono tragiche, in particolare con l’arrivo della calura estiva. Ma soprattutto mancano le prospettive per l’avvenire.
Gli incontri a Erbil sono stati letteralmente un pugno nello stomaco. Nessuna carta geografica, nessun’analisi geopolitica regge il paragone con la testimonianza delle vittime. Impossibile eludere la loro insistente domanda: «Che cosa state facendo per noi?».
Mi pare che il primo livello della risposta debba essere quello umanitario. Sono stati compiuti grandi sforzi, ma il bisogno è sterminato. Per questo è necessario un impeto di solidarietà ancora più grande. Non lasciamo più nessuno nelle tendopoli! Allestiamo scuole per permettere ai bambini e ai ragazzi di non passare in ozio la giornata! Restituiamo ai profughi luoghi di socializzazione e di occupazione!
C’è poi un secondo livello della questione. Molti vorrebbero tornare ai loro villaggi, oggi controllati da Isis, ma questo non è realisticamente possibile senza un intervento militare. In questo caso credo debba valere il principio dell’ingerenza umanitaria, della protezione delle vittime e anche dei loro carnefici, perché, come ha ricordato papa Francesco, «fermare l’aggressore ingiusto è un diritto dell’umanità, ma è anche un diritto dell’aggressore, di essere fermato per non fare del male». Come ha richiamato il Patriarca Sako, questo intervento, sotto l’egida dell’Onu, dovrà appoggiarsi sulle forze locali, superando la stasi di una coalizione internazionale inconcludente e sfilacciata.
Altrettanto importante è il livello politico. Nel discutere degli assetti futuri del Medio Oriente, molti hanno sottolineato come sia necessario uscire dal discorso della protezione delle minoranze per imboccare decisamente la strada della cittadinanza e dei diritti per tutti. La causa non è soltanto cristiana, è di tutti quelli che hanno a cuore un Medio Oriente moderno e pacificato. Per questo sarà dunque fondamentale un lavoro educativo che richiederà decenni per sradicare, come diceva il Patriarca Sako, i germogli del jihadismo fin dalla loro origine.
Dimensione umanitaria, militare, politica, educativa: l’Iraq — e la vicina Siria ove si sta consumando il martirio di Aleppo, nuova Sarajevo — richiedono un’azione coordinata a più livelli, impegnativa e difficile. Ma una certezza s’impone per l’Europa ripiegata su di sé: occorre uscire dal narcisismo miope che ci imprigiona in calcoli spesso vuoti. Bisogna agire e agire subito, semplicemente perché non è accettabile che ancora oggi centinaia di migliaia di persone siano cacciate dalle loro case o uccise per ragioni religiose. Questo deve bastare per suscitare un impegno degno della miglior storia del nostro continente.
* Cardinale, Arcivescovo di Milano
Presidente del Centro Oasis

Leggi tutto!

venerdì, giugno 26, 2015

 

Le cardinal Barbarin inaugure l’école Saint-Irénée à Erbil


Dimanche 28 juin à 17h, sera officiellement inaugurée l’école Saint-Irénée, à Erbil, au Kurdistan irakien, par le cardinal Philippe Barbarin, en présence de Michel Récipon, président du directoire de la Fondation Raoul Follereau, et de représentants de la Fondation Saint-Irénée et de la Fondation Mérieux. Lors de cette cérémonie, les 900 futurs écoliers recevront leurs cartables garnis de fournitures scolaires. Les locaux seront bénis par le cardinal Philippe Barbarin, archevêque de Lyon, Mgr Petros Mouché, archevêque syriaque-catholique de Mossoul (en résidence à Erbil) et Mgr Louis-Raphaël Sako 1er, patriarche de Babylone des Chaldéens. Trois Fondations partenaires
La construction de cette école a été rendue possible grâce à la mobilisation et à la générosité des Français ainsi qu’à l’engagement de la Fondation Saint-Irénée, de la Fondation Mérieux et de la Fondation Raoul Follereau. Il s’agit du second projet mené en partenariat par ces trois fondations. Cet hiver, elles avaient financé le relogement de familles déplacées à Erbil dans un immeuble appelé Al Amal (l’espoir).
Au profit des populations déplacées
900 élèves de primaire et de secondaire seront ainsi accueillis dans 18 salles de classe à la rentrée. Depuis leur départ de Mossoul et de la plaine de Ninive en juin 2014, les minorités réfugiées, principalement chrétienne et yézidie, ont trouvé refuge dans des camps ou des immeubles d’Erbil. Les enfants y sont peu ou n’y sont pas aujourd’hui scolarisés. C’est pour remédier à ce manque, identifié lors du voyage des 6 et 7 décembre 2014 que le projet de l’école s’est imposé comme une nécessité, ainsi qu’un pari pour l’avenir de ces populations.
3ème voyage du cardinal Barbarin
Le cardinal Philippe Barbarin sera donc en Irak les 28 et 29 juin, accompagné d’une petite délégation représentant l’enseignement catholique de Lyon, la Fondation Saint-Irénée et le jumelage Lyon-Mossoul. Il profitera de l’inauguration de l’école Saint-Irénée pour aller rencontrer des réfugiés dans un camp proche d’Erbil. Il participera à une émission spéciale sur Radio Al Salam, au sujet de la situation des chrétiens d’Orient.
Il s’agit de son troisième voyage en Irak en moins d’un an (après juillet et décembre 2014).
Depuis sa rencontre à Lyon en mars 2014 avec Mgr Louis-Raphaël Sako, patriarche des Chaldéens, le cardinal Philippe Barbarin est très interpellé par le drame vécu par des milliers d’Irakiens au nom de leur foi. Il a lancé, lors de son premier voyage en juillet 2014, un jumelage entre les diocèses de Lyon et de Mossoul, pour apporter un soutien spirituel et matériel, spécialement via la Fondation Saint-Irénée.
Genèse d’un nom
Saint Irénée, dont la fête est célébrée le 28 juin – jour de l’inauguration de l’école –, est le deuxième évêque du diocèse de Lyon (177-202). Irénée venait de Smyrne en Asie Mineure (actuelle Turquie). Dans sa jeunesse, il avait été disciple de saint Polycarpe, également venu de Smyrne, qui avait été lui-même un disciple de saint Jean l’Apôtre. Premier grand théologien de l’Eglise d’Occident, ce Père de l’Eglise est un trait d’union entre les Eglises d’Orient et d’Occident.

- Don en ligne sur www.fondationsaintirenee.org et chèque à l’ordre de FSI.

Leggi tutto!

giovedì, giugno 25, 2015

 

Mar Louis Raphael I Sako's message: "The unity of the Church of the East"

By Baghdadhope*

Below the original English version of the message by the Chaldean Patriarch Louis Raphael I Sako about the proposed reunion of the Chaldean Church, the Assyrian Church of the East, and the Ancient Church of the East for the sake of unity and survival in Iraq received by Baghdadhope a few minutes ago.
The original message in Arabic was published yesterday by the Patriarcate Website and you can read it by clicking here:
Here you can read yesterday interview to Mar Sako by Baghdadhope (Italian)

"The unity of the Church of the East"

I would like to share some personal thoughts with those of others, since they may contribute to achieving the project of "the unity of the Church of the East".
Unity is the commandment of the Lord Jesus, "so that they may be one" (John 17/11), and the demand of Christians who face significant challenges that threaten their existence in diaspora with assimilation, and in the motherland with extinction.
I propose that we adopt a single denomination for the church: The Church of the East as it was for many centuries, and that we not maintain the factional denominations.  The single denomination will give it strength and momentum, and it can become a model for other churches.
The communion of faith and unity with the Holy Roman See is a fundamental base of unity.  It is an increase of power, not a decrease, especially since there is no difference in doctrine, but only in its formal expression.  Therefore, to think of disassembling the link of “the Church of the East” with the See of Rome would be a great loss and cause of weakness. Unity does not mean uniformity, nor the melting of our own church identity into one style, but it maintains unity in diversity and we remain one apostolic universal church, the Oriental Church, that maintains its independence of administration, laws and liturgies, traditions and support through respect for the authority of the Patriarch and the Synod of Bishops.
After deliberation and dialogue between the three branches and the acceptance of this communion with Rome:
1. The current Patriarchs: Louis Raphael Sako, Patriarch of the Chaldean Catholic Church, and Mar Addai II, Patriarch of the ancient Church of the East, would submit their resignations without any conditions, but their desire for unity.
2. The Bishops of the three churches would meet to choose a new Patriarch.
3. The elected Patriarch should have assistants from each branch to enhance the “weft” (the permanent Synod).
4. The Patriarch and the Synod would leave national interests to the laity, because the church should be open to everyone and concerned with the best interests of all.
5. The Patriarch and the Synod would prepare for a General Synod to develop a new road-map for The One Church of the East.

Leggi tutto!
 

Le patriarche Sako propose de réunifier l’antique « Église d’Orient »

By La Croix

Face aux « importants défis qui menacent leur existence – celui de l’assimilation dans la diaspora, celui de l’extinction dans leur patrie d’origine » – le patriarche Louis Raphaël Ier Sako des chaldéens a choisi de faire un geste fort.
Dans un communiqué rendu public jeudi 25 juin 2015 et intitulé « L’unité de l’Église d’Orient », il tend la main à ses deux Églises « sœurs » : l’Église assyrienne, et l’ancienne Église d’Orient qui s’en est séparée en 1968.

Une seule dénomination

« L’unité est le commandement du Seigneur Jésus, ’afin que tous soient un’ (Jean 17-11) », rappelle-t-il en préambule, soulignant aussi la « demande des chrétiens » en ce sens, qu’ils soient dans leurs pays d’origine (l’Irak principalement, mais aussi l’Iran, la Syrie) ou dans leurs pays d’émigration (Europe, Amérique du Nord, Australie).
« Je propose que nous adoptions une seule dénomination l'Église de l'Orient, celle qui a prévalu pendant des siècles. Une seule dénomination lui donnera force et élan et pourra en faire un modèle pour d'autres Églises », écrit le patriarche Sako.
L’antique Église de l’Orient - ou Église de Perse - est une des premières Églises chrétiennes. Selon la tradition, elle aurait été fondée par l’apôtre Thomas. Séparée après le concile d’Éphèse (431) qui condamna les thèses de Nestorius, elle a connu un temps un grand développement en Chine et en Inde où elle est toujours très implantée.

Trois Églises pour des racines communes

Trois Églises sont aujourd’hui ses héritières.
L’Église assyrienne, qualifiée d’apostolique » en raison de sa fondation par Thomas, attend actuellement l’élection d’un nouveau patriarche, depuis le décès en mars de Mar Dinkha IV. Son siège patriarcal est actuellement près de Chicago (États-Unis) mais son synode a annoncé récemment son intention de le rapatrier à Bagdad, où il était installé depuis 780.
L’ancienne Église d’Orient, s’est séparée en 1968 de cette Église assyrienne, en raison justement du déménagement du siège patriarcal hors d’Irak et de l’adoption du calendrier grégorien. Son siège patriarcal est à Bagdad et son patriarche actuel est Mar Addai II.
Enfin, l’Église chaldéenne est née au XVIe siècle lors de son union à Rome. Son patriarche est donc Raphaël Louis Ier Sako, installé à Bagdad également.

Proposition audacieuse

La proposition de ce dernier est audacieuse dans la mesure où il propose aux deux premières non seulement « la communion de foi et de l’unité » entre elles mais aussi « avec le Saint-Siège romain ». « Il y aurait une augmentation de la puissance et non une diminution, surtout parce qu'il n’existe pas de différence de doctrine [ndlr  : entre nous] mais seulement dans son expression formelle », assure-t-il. « Par conséquent, démonter le lien de l’Église de l'Orient’ avec le Siège de Rome serait une grande perte et une cause de faiblesse. »
En 1994, un pas important a déjà été fait grâce à une déclaration commune signée par le patriarche Mar Dinkha IV et Jean-Paul II, reconnaissant qu’assyriens et catholiques « peuvent désormais proclamer ensemble devant le monde leur foi commune dans le mystère de l’Incarnation ». L’Église catholique accepte, depuis 2001, l’intercommunion entre les deux Églises.

Le drame de l’Irak

Mais unité ne signifie pas uniformité, ni fusion, prend soin de préciser Louis Raphaël Sako dans son texte. Désireux de réaliser « l’unité dans la diversité », il affirme souhaiter le maintien de l’indépendance de cette Église d’Orient pour son « administration, ses lois et ses liturgies, ses traditions ».
« Une église liée à Rome, mais plus libre de gérer ses propres affaires », ainsi Louis Sako résume-t-il son projet dans une interview accordée en italien au site Internet Baghdadhope.
Conscient des difficultés d’un tel projet, le P. Muhannad Tawil, dominicain, curé de la paroisse chaldéenne de Lyon, salue néanmoins l’initiative. « L’idée du patriarche est de revenir à nos racines communes », fait-il valoir. « Dans une période trouble de notre existence, l’unité fait la force. Le drame de l’Irak, c’est la division ethnique et religieuse  : par cette proposition, le patriarche Sako veut donner le témoignage exactement inverse. »
Concrètement, « après délibération et dialogue entre les trois branches et l’acceptation de cette communion avec Rome », les patriarches actuels démissionneraient « sans conditions », les évêques des trois Églises se réuniraient en synode pour choisir un nouveau patriarche. Le patriarche élu serait aidé par « des assistants de chaque branche ». À charge pour le patriarche et le synode de préparer « une nouvelle feuille de route pour l'unique Église de l'Orient ».
Pour l’heure, aucune réaction n’est encore venue des deux Églises visées.

Leggi tutto!
 

Iraq: Sako (Caldei), "Disposto a dimissioni per favorire unità cristiani"

By SIR

Dimettersi dalla carica patriarcale per favorire l’unità delle chiese in Iraq sotto un’unica denominazione, quella di “Chiesa d’Oriente”: è la proposta del patriarca caldeo, Mar Louis Raphael I Sako, che arriva direttamente attraverso il sito ufficiale del Patriarcato. Una proposta che lo stesso Sako, parlando con il sito Baghdadhope, ha così motivato: “in Iraq la nostra presenza come cristiani è minacciata e nessuno sa quando e se l’Isis scomparirà dal nostro territorio e come la situazione evolverà. Negli anni molti nostri fedeli, e non parlo solo dei caldei, hanno lasciato la madrepatria e con il passare delle generazioni saranno sempre più integrati nelle società dei paesi dove ora vivono. L’unità delle chiese in Iraq, chiese di lunga tradizione apostolica ma piccole e schiacciate dagli eventi, è la nostra unica salvezza. Per questa ragione, e alla luce dei tentativi di riunione già in atto tra la Chiesa Assira dell’Est e la Chiesa Antica dell’Est, ho proposto un sinodo congiunto tra queste due chiese e la chiesa caldea per iniziare il cammino verso l’unità”. Sinodo che dovrebbe portare alle dimissioni del patriarca caldeo e a quelle di Mar Addai II, patriarca della Chiesa Antica dell’Est - la carica patriarcale per la Chiesa Assira d’Oriente è attualmente vacante dopo la morte di Mar Dinkha IV - e da qui alla nomina da parte dei tre sinodi congiunti di un nuovo Patriarca.
In quanto all’eventuale riconoscimento dell’autorità del Papa da parte delle due altre chiese, aggiunge il patriarca caldeo, “penso che la fede comune, peraltro già sancita in passato come nel caso della Dichiarazione Cristologica Comune firmata da Papa Giovanni Paolo II e da Mar Dinkha IV, sarà di aiuto. Negli anni passati troppe spinte nazionalistiche ci hanno divisi. Io penso sia arrivato il momento in cui le due chiese, quella Assira e quella Antica dell’Est, siano pronte e desiderino abbandonare queste posizioni nazionalistiche e ritornare alla chiesa originaria”. “Cammino lungo e doloroso” riconosce il patriarca caldeo che in individua nel prossimo settembre il tempo giusto per “discutere e valutare” la proposta. In quel mese, infatti, ci sarà il Sinodo della Chiesa Caldea a Baghdad dove risiede anche Mar Addai II, e nello stesso mese quello della Chiesa Assira dell’Est ad Erbil. “Quello sarà il momento per parlare a cuore aperto tra noi e cercare una soluzione che ci aiuti a non scomparire dall’Iraq e poter testimoniare la gioia del Vangelo del Signore ai nostri fratelli musulmani” conclude Mar Sako.

Leggi tutto!
 

Iraq. La proposta del patriarca caldeo: unire tre Chiese per la loro salvezza

By Zenit

Azzerare i tre Patriarcati che adesso si richiamano all’antica Chiesa d’Oriente e ricomporre la piena unità delle tre comunità ecclesiali sotto la guida di un unico Patriarca. È la proposta choc del primate della Chiesa caldea, Mar Louis Raphael Sako I, pubblicata sotto il profilo di "pensieri personali" dal sito ufficiale del Patriarcato Caldeo a firma dello stesso patriarca.
L'idea di Sako - ripresa dal sito Vatican Insider - nasce dalla constatazione oggettiva del momento delicato vissuto dalle tre comunità ecclesiali autoctone della Mesopotamia (caldea, assira e antica dell’Est), che vede la loro stessa esistenza messa a rischio nelle proprie terre d'origine. In particolare la Chiesa caldea, maggioritaria e unita alla Sede apostolica di Roma, è devastata al suo interno dalla emorragia di fedeli dai territori iracheni, a causa delle minacce dello Stato Islamico e dei conseguenti interventi militari guidati dagli Stati Uniti. Un flusso continuo che rischia di provocarne l'estinzione proprio in quelle regioni dove essa si radicò millenni fa.
"In Iraq la nostra presenza come cristiani è minacciata e nessuno sa quando e se l’Isis scomparirà dal nostro territorio e come la situazione evolverà", ha spiegato lo stesso patriarca al sito BaghdadHope. "Negli anni - ha aggiunto - molti nostri fedeli, e non parlo solo dei caldei, hanno lasciato la madrepatria e con il passare delle generazioni saranno sempre più integrati nelle società dei paesi dove ora vivono. L’unità delle chiese in Iraq, chiese di lunghissima tradizione apostolica ma piccole e schiacciate dagli eventi, è la nostra unica salvezza".
Per questa ragione, ed alla luce dei tentativi di riunione già in atto tra la chiesa assira e la chiesa antica dell’Est, Sako ribadisce quindi la sua proposta di "un sinodo congiunto tra queste due chiese e la chiesa caldea al fine di iniziare il nuovo cammino verso l’unità”.
Il progetto, più nel dettaglio, prevede una Chiesa patriarcale, indipendente dal punto di vista giurisdizionale, universale e aperta a tutti, senza riduzionismi "nazionalisti", ma in piena comunione con la Chiesa di Roma, sotto il titolo di "Chiesa d'Oriente". Così unite, secondo mar Sako, le tre chiese potreanno affrontare insieme i pericoli che minacciano la vita stessa delle comunità cristiane autoctone in tutto il Medio Oriente.
A livello pratico, la proposta prevede quindi la rinuncia al titolo patriarcale sia da parte di Sako che di Mar Addai, patriarca della Chiesa Antica dell’Est (la carica patriarcale per la Chiesa Assira d’Oriente è attualmente vacante dopo la morte di Mar Dinkha IV nello scorso marzo ndr). Tutti i vescovi delle tre Chiese attuali dovrebbero poi riunirsi in un Sinodo unitario per eleggere un unico Patriarca, che a sua volta sceglierà come suoi principali coadiutori tre vescovi provenienti dalle tre diverse Chiese "in stato di fusione". 
Tra gli ostacoli al progetto c'è il fatto che si tratterebbe dell’unione di una chiesa (quella caldea), che riconosce l’autorità del Pontefice Romano e di due chiese che invece non la riconoscono. Sako ripete invece che tale comunione si fonda sulla condivisione della stessa fede e dottrina, attestata anche dalla dichiarazione cristologica comune sottoscritta nel 1994 da Giovanni Paolo II e Mar Dinkha, dove si confessa che la Chiesa Assira d’Oriente e la Chiesa cattolica confessano la stessa fede in Cristo, e si riconosce che le controversie cristologiche del lontano passato erano in gran parte dovute a malintesi.
“Penso che se ciò a cui si mira è l’unità che molti fedeli chiedono si potrà realizzare" questo progetto, dice il patriarca a BaghdadHope. "Si tratterebbe, è ovvio, di una chiesa cattolica di cui il Pontefice Romano rimarrebbe a capo, questo deve essere chiaro, ma più forte ed in grado di far valere di più, anche a Roma, il peso delle proprie tradizioni, liturgie ed usi. Una chiesa legata a Roma ma più libera di gestire i propri affari interni. La comunicazione con Roma è a volte lunga e difficile. La rispettiamo, ma le urgenze delle chiese 'a rischio' sono diverse da quelle in paesi in cui la loro esistenza non è minacciata".
Altro ostacolo: le "spinte nazionalistiche", soprattutto in seno alle comunità caldee e assire della diaspora, che già in passato hanno creato divisioni. Anche su questo punto, il primate caldeo è positivo: "Io penso sia arrivato il momento in cui le due chiese, quella assira e quella antica dell’Est, siano pronte e desiderino abbandonare queste posizioni nazionalistiche e ritornare alla chiesa originaria. Io vedo un apertura, lo stesso fatto che il Sinodo della Chiesa Assira svoltosi all’inizio di giugno sia stato rimandato proprio per meglio preparare l’eventuale riunione con la Chiesa Antica dell’Est, che a sua volta si è ripromessa di discuterla nel  prossimo sinodo di luglio,  è segno di  grande apertura. Èstato un bel gesto.”

Leggi tutto!
 

L'azzardo del Patriarca caldeo: rifondiamo la «Chiesa d'Oriente»

By La Stampa - Vatican Insider
Gianni valente

Ha usato toni di basso profilo. Ma la proposta lanciata dal Patriarca Louis Raphael, Primate della Chiesa caldea, è comunque spiazzante e fragorosa: azzerare i tre Patriarcati che adesso si richiamano all’eredità dell’antica Chiesa d’Oriente – la prima che portò il cristianesimo in Persia, in India e fino alla lontana Cina - e ricomporre l’unità piena delle tre comunità ecclesiali sotto la guida di un unico Patriarca.
Il momento delicato vissuto dalle tre comunità ecclesiali autoctone della Mesopotamia vede la loro stessa esistenza messa a rischio nelle proprie terre d'origine. La Chiesa caldea, maggioritaria e unita alla Sede apostolica di Roma, sta vivendo dai tempi degli interventi militari occidentali a guida Usa una emorragia di fedeli dai suoi territori iracheni che rischia di provocarne l'estinzione nelle regioni del suo radicamento millenario. La Chiesa assira d'Oriente, ormai da decenni concentrata per lo più nelle fiorenti comunità in diaspora sparse in America, Europa e Oceania, è alle prese con una delicata fase di transizione: dopo la morte – lo scorso 26 marzo – del Patriarca Mar Dinkha IV, l'elezione del successore è stata rimandata a settembre, mentre è ancora in ballo il ri-trasferimento della sede patriarcale da Chicago – dove il Patriarca era emigrato «in esilio» nel 1940 – a Erbil, la capitale del Kurdistan iracheno. Intanto, la minoritaria Antica Chiesa d'Oriente – nata nel 1964 da uno scisma in seno alla Chiesa assira d'oriente, e attualmente guidata dal Patriarca Mar Addai II, residente a Baghdad – è chiamata a confrontarsi con la proposta di riunificazione che le è stata presentata dai vescovi assiri.
In questo scenario in movimento, il Patriarca caldeo Louis Raphael ha pubblicato sul sito del Patriarcato alcuni «pensieri personali» in cui si delinea in via embrionale un vero e proprio progetto di rifondazione della Chiesa d’Oriente, come Chiesa patriarcale indipendente dal punto di vista giurisdizionale, ma in piena comunione con la Chiesa di Roma. Il ritorno all'unità piena tra le tre Chiese di ascendenza nestoriana - sostiene il Patriarca nella sua proposta – serve anche a affrontare insieme i pericoli che minacciano la sopravvivenza stessa delle comunità cristiane autoctone in tutto il Medio Oriente.
A livello pratico, la proposta del Patriarca caldeo prevede la rinuncia senza condizioni al titolo patriarcale sia da parte sua che del Patriarca Mar Addai. Tutti i vescovi delle tre Chiese attuali dovrebbero poi riunirsi in un Sinodo unitario per eleggere un unico Patriarca, che poi dovrebbe scegliere come suoi principali coadiutori tre vescovi provenienti dalle tre diverse Chiese «in stato di fusione». Andrebbero messe da parte le auto-definizioni «etniche» che contraddistinguono attualmente sia la Chiesa caldea che quella assira: la «nuova» Chiesa si chiamerebbe semplicemente Chiesa d'Oriente, universale e aperta a tutti, senza cedimenti a riduzionismi «nazionalisti». Un Sinodo generale programmatico, aperto anche ai laici, dovrebbe poi stabilire la tabella di marcia per implementare concretamente la piena unità gerarchica e strutturale tra le tre diverse compagini ecclesiali.
Riguardo al punto nevralgico della comunione con il Vescovo di Roma, il Patriarca caldeo ripete che tale comunione si fonda sulla condivisione della stessa fede e dottrina, attestata anche dalla dichiarazione cristologica comune sottoscritta nel 1994 da Giovanni Paolo II e Mar Dinkha, dove si confessa che la Chiesa Assira d’Oriente e la Chiesa cattolica confessano la stessa fede in Cristo, e si riconosce che le controversie cristologiche del lontano passato erano in gran parte dovute a malintesi. Quella di Roma – ricorda il Patriarca Louis Raphael, rifacendosi alla ecclesiologia condivisa tra Oriente e Occidente per tutto il primo millennio cristiano – è la Prima Sedes, e la piena comunione con il Vescovo di Roma non comporta uno «scioglimento» della propria identità ecclesiale, ma aiuta a custodire «l'unità nella molteplicità», mantenendo la propria fisionomia a livello liturgico, canonico, disciplinare e giurisdizionale. Tutelando quindi anche le prerogative del Patriarca e del Sinodo.
Il Patriarca caldeo Louis Raphael I già nel settembre 2013 aveva invitato il Patriarca assiro Mar Dinkha a iniziare un cammino di dialogo per ripristinare la piena comunione ecclesiale tra la comunità cristiana caldea e quella assira. All'inizio di ottobre 2013, Mar Dinkha aveva risposto positivamente all'appello, suggerendo la creazione di un “Comitato congiunto” come strumento per affrontare insieme le urgenze condivise dalle due Chiese sorelle, che hanno in comune lo stesso patrimonio liturgico, teologico e spirituale.
In tempi recenti, l’iniziativa del Patriarca caldeo ha un precedente suggestivo ed eloquente, anche per i suoi esiti. Alla metà degli anni Novanta del secolo scorso, il Patriarcato greco-cattolico melchita di Antiochia aveva messo in cantiere un progetto di piena riunificazione sacramentale con il Patriarcato greco-ortodosso di Antiochia, pur mantenendo la piena comunione con la Chiesa di Roma. Tutto aveva preso avvio dall’anziano vescovo melchita Elias Zoghby, già noto per i suoi appassionati interventi pro-unità al Concilio Vaticano II, che nel febbraio 1995 aveva scritto una professione di fede in due punti, in cui confessava di credere «in tutto ciò che insegna l’Ortodossia orientale » e di essere nel contempo in comunione «con il Vescovo di Roma, nei limiti riconosciuti al Primo dei Vescovi dai Santi Padri d’Oriente nel Primo Millennio e prima della separazione». Pochi giorni dopo, tale professione di fede era stata sottoscritta da Georges Khodr, metropolita ortodosso di Byblos: «Io ritengo - aveva scritto Khodr - che la professione di fede di monsignor Elias Zoghby ponga le condizioni necessarie e sufficienti per ristabilire l’unità delle Chiese ortodosse con la Chiesa di Roma». Su tale base, il progetto di ristabilimento dell’unità «antiochena» tra le due Chiese trovò l’appoggio di quasi tutti i vescovi greco-melchiti. Mentre dalla Santa Sede arrivarono nel settembre del ’96 sollecitazioni alla cautela. Secondo i collaboratori del Papa, Roma poteva prendere in considerazione le eventuali decisioni «antiochene» solo se esse non avessero prodotto conflitti e tensioni in seno all’Ortodossia. Si voleva evitare l’accusa di creare divisioni tra le Chiese ortodosse, visto che la Chiesa di Roma aveva già iniziato il dialogo teologico per favorire un riavvicinamento con tutta l’Ortodossia nel suo complesso. E in effetti, alla fine furono proprio i vescovi del Patriarcato greco-ortodosso di Antiochia riuniti in Sinodo a congelare il progetto, ribadendo che il dialogo bilaterale con i «fratelli» greco-melchiti «non poteva essere separato dal ristabilimento della comunione tra la Sede di Roma e tutta l’Ortodossia».
È probabile che anche la proposta del Patriarca caldeo Louis Raphael I sia destinata a trovare opposizioni insormontabili soprattutto in seno alle comunità caldee e assire della diaspora, dove la rivendicazione dell'elemento etnico-nazionale assiro e caldeo è stato coltivato e fomentato anche da alcuni esponenti della gerarchia ecclesiastica come fattore identitario. Nondimeno, la proposta del Patriarca caldeo ha il merito di provare a lanciare il cuore oltre l'ostacolo, riproponendo – come ha fatto più volte anche Papa Francesco - l'esperienza di comunione del primo millennio cristiano come modello a cui guardare per camminare concretamente verso il ripristino della piena comunione sacramentale tra Chiese sorelle.

Leggi tutto!

mercoledì, giugno 24, 2015

 

Proposta choc del Patriarca Caldeo: l'unione di tre chiese in Iraq per la loro salvezza

By Baghdadhope*

Chiesa d’Oriente. Ecco il nome di quella che potrebbe essere una nuova realtà ecclesiastica in Iraq secondo la proposta oggi pubblicata dal sito ufficiale del Patriarcato Caldeo a firma dello stesso Patriarca: Mar Louis Raphael I Sako con cui Baghdadhope ha parlato.

Beatitudine, ci spieghi. Lei ha proposto di dimettersi dalla carica patriarcale per favorire l’unità delle chiese in Iraq.
“Certo. Si deve partire da alcuni dati di fatto. In Iraq la nostra presenza come cristiani è minacciata e nessuno sa quando e se l’ISIS scomparirà dal nostro territorio e come la situazione evolverà. Negli anni molti nostri fedeli, e non parlo solo dei caldei, hanno lasciato la madrepatria e con il passare delle generazioni saranno sempre più integrati nelle società dei paesi dove ora vivono. L’unità delle chiese in Iraq, chiese di lunghissima tradizione apostolica ma piccole e schiacciate dagli eventi, è la nostra unica salvezza. Per questa ragione, ed alla luce dei tentativi di riunione già in atto tra la Chiesa Assira dell’Est e la Chiesa Antica dell’Est, ho proposto un sinodo congiunto tra queste due chiese e la chiesa caldea al fine di iniziare il nuovo cammino verso l’unità.”
Sinodo che dovrebbe portare alle Sue dimissioni ed a quelle di Mar Addai II, Patriarca della Chiesa Antica dell’Est (La carica patriarcale per la Chiesa Assira d’Oriente è attualmente vacante dopo la morte di Mar Dinkha IV nello scorso marzo) ed alla nomina, da parte dei tre sinodi congiunti di un nuovo Patriarca.
“Proprio così. Ovviamente la mia è una proposta da studiare insieme. Si tratterebbe di unificare queste tre chiese, che a livello di fede già sono unite,  sotto l’autorità di un nuovo patriarca che possa meglio difendere gli interessi delle nostre, o meglio dire, della nostra comunità.”
Beatitudine, si tratterebbe però dell’unione di una chiesa, quella caldea, che riconosce l’autorità del Pontefice Romano e di due chiese che invece non la riconoscono. Lei pensa davvero che sia possibile? E come?
“Penso che se ciò a cui si mira è l’unità che molti  fedeli chiedono si potrà realizzare.  Si tratterebbe, è ovvio, di una chiesa cattolica di cui il Pontefice Romano rimarrebbe a capo, questo deve essere chiaro, ma più forte ed in grado di far valere di più, anche a Roma, il peso delle proprie tradizioni, liturgie ed usi. Una chiesa legata a Roma ma più libera di gestire i propri affari interni. La comunicazione con Roma è a volte lunga e difficile. La rispettiamo, ma le urgenze delle chiese “a rischio” sono diverse da quelle in paesi in cui la loro esistenza non è minacciata. In quanto all’eventuale riconoscimento dell’autorità del Papa da parte delle due altre chiese io penso che la fede comune, peraltro già sancita in passato come nel caso della Dichiarazione Cristologica Comune firmata da Papa Giovanni Paolo II e da Mar Dinkha IV, sarà di aiuto. Negli anni passati troppe spinte nazionalistiche ci hanno divisi. Io penso sia arrivato il momento in cui le due chiese, quella Assira e quella Antica dell’Est, siano pronte e desiderino abbandonare queste posizioni nazionalistiche e ritornare alla chiesa originaria. Io vedo un apertura, lo stesso fatto che il Sinodo della Chiesa Assira svoltosi all’inizio di giugno sia stato rimandato proprio per meglio preparare l’eventuale riunione con la Chiesa Antica dell’Est, che a sua volta si è ripromessa di discuterla nel  prossimo sinodo di luglio,  è segno di  grande apertura. E’ stato un bel gesto.”

Beatitudine, Lei ha parlato di nazionalismo, non pensa che una tale proposta possa irritare i fedeli, specialmente quelli in diaspora più sensibili a questo tema?
“Ciò che conta è che qui, in Iraq, queste differenze nazionalistiche e di appartenenza ad una chiesa o all’altra non contano, ben altri sono i problemi. Oltre a ciò, ad un esame obiettivo della situazione è innegabile che l’unione delle diverse comunità possa anche portare ad un maggior peso politico qui in patria. Dirò di più, una tale unione potrebbe spingere altre chiese minoritarie in Medio Oriente ad unirsi per contare di più. Chi dice che non potrebbe essere la spinta perché, ad esempio, la Chiesa Sira possa unirsi a quella Maronita? Lo ripeto, a mio parere i problemi che potrebbero nascere potranno essere risolti. Bisogna uscire dal passato perché oggi affrontiamo realtà diverse.
Il nome proposto è quello della chiesa di origine di tutti noi, Chiesa d’Oriente, una chiesa cattolica nei fatti che però avrà una sua identità locale. D’altra parte non si dice Chiesa maronita Cattolica, ma solo chiesa Maronita, perché non Chiesa d’Oriente? In questo modo potremo testimoniare la nostra fede ed il nostro amore. Uniti e non divisi. I musulmani ci chiedono sempre: perchè siete divisi visto che il vostro Gesù parla di amore e voi dite che la vostra è una religione d'amore? Penso sul serio, come patriarca, che la divisione sia uno scandalo e sia contro la testimonianza di fede."
Nessun problema in vista, quindi?

“Non dico questo. Dico che con l’aiuto di Dio ogni problema può essere superato se alla base di tutto c’è la Fede in Lui. Certo tutto dovrà essere discusso con Roma. Il processo, se avviato, non sarà breve e forse non indolore. Ci saranno vescovi da accettare nel seno della comunità cattolica, eventuali questioni legate alle giurisdizioni episcopali da appianare. Il problema è che alla luce della continua e gravissima emorragia di fedeli dalla nostra terra è necessario fare qualcosa se non vogliamo che le nostre piccole chiese spariscano."

In un’intervista a Fides lo scorso febbraio Lei ha spiegato il progetto della Lega Caldea di cui Lei stesso ha proposto la formazione con queste parole: “Come caldei” spiega a Fides il Patriarca Sako “viviamo un tempo di confusione e di incertezza. La nostra presenza nella società è debole, frammentata nel campo della politica, della cultura, dell'azione sociale. Una 'Lega caldea' potrà aiutarci a rendere più concreto e efficace il nostro contributo alla vita civile del Paese”.  Un tale discorso come si spiega alla luce dell'attuale proposta di unità e superamento dei nazionalismi?

"Con il fatto che lo scopo ultimo è quello di mantenere l’unità nel rispetto delle diversità. Saremo sempre ciò che siamo ora, ma lotteremo insieme per i nostri diritti comuni. In quell’intervista  si parla di contributo alla vita civile del paese, uniti potremo dare un contributo maggiore anche alla vita politica, una condizione imprescindibile perché siano rispettati. Anche nello stesso ambito della proposta Chiesa d’Oriente essa riconoscerà sì il primato di Roma ma ogni sua componente manterrà le proprie tradizioni, riti, leggi ed amministrazione nel pieno rispetto del Patriarca e del Sinodo."  

Beatitudine, questa proposta appare come uno scossone sia nei rapporti tra le chiese coinvolte sia nei confronti della Santa Sede, una sorta di “forzatura di mano” per contare di più crescendo di numero, in chierici e fedeli.  Questa interpretazione è sbagliata?

“Diciamo che a volte ci sentiamo trascurati. Sia chiaro, siamo grati per l’aiuto che da tutti, e dalla Santa Sede in particolare, è arrivato specialmente  dopo i tragici fatti di Mosul e della Piana di Ninive. Non dimentichiamo le parole di vicinanza nei nostri confronti che Papa Francesco non manca di pronunciare. Il fatto è che, proprio per l’anomala situazione che stiamo vivendo: le violenze, la fuga, la diaspora, lo stesso fatto di avere le radici in paesi problematici per quanto riguarda la presenza cristiana, una maggiore autonomia decisionale, ad esempio per la nomina di un vescovo o il semplice spostamento di un sacerdote in diaspora da una sede all’altra, sarebbe utile. Ripeto, la mia è una proposta da discutere e valutare, a settembre ci sarà il Sinodo della Chiesa Caldea a Baghdad dove risiede anche Mar Addai II, e nello stesso mese quello della Chiesa Assira dell’Est ad Erbil. Quello sarà il momento giusto per parlare a cuore aperto tra noi e cercare una soluzione che ci aiuti a non scomparire dall’Iraq e poter testimoniare la gioia del Vangelo del Signore ai nostri fratelli musulmani."

Leggi tutto!
 

Isis: nuovo audio, attaccate cristiani durante il Ramadan

By AGI

In un nuovo messaggio audio diffuso dall'Isis, il portavoce Abu Muhammad al-Adnani esorta i musulmani ad "attaccare durante il Ramadan i cristiani, gli sciiti e i musulmani apostati che sostengono la coalizione internazionale in Iraq e in Siria". "Trasformiamo il mese di digiuno del Ramadan, cominciato la settimana scorsa, in un tempo di calamita' per gli infedeli sciiti e i musulmani apostati, sollecitando nuovi attacchi in Iraq, Siria e Libia", dice la voce registrata nel messaggio diffuso dai siti jihadisti, della durata di 28 minuti.

Leggi tutto!

martedì, giugno 23, 2015

 

On World Refugee Day, USCCB Migration Chairman calls upon United States to Protect Syrian and Iraqi Refugees and Displaced

By United States Conference of Catholic Bishops

In comments made in conjunction with World Refugee Day, observed June 20, Bishop Eusebio Elizondo, auxiliary bishop of Seattle and chairman of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ (USCCB) Committee on Migration, called upon U.S. officials to do more to respond to the ongoing refugee crisis in the Middle East stemming from conflict in Syria and Iraq.
“This is a crisis that continues to grow and has no end in sight,” said Bishop Elizondo. “We can no longer turn our heads away from the human suffering of our brothers and sisters in the Middle East.”
The refugee crisis stemming from conflict in Syria and Iraq has reached historic proportions, with close to 15 million persons forced from their homes, many at risk of death. 7.6 million Syrians are internally displaced and as many as 4 million reside in neighboring countries or have fled to Europe or other parts of the world, while over 3 million Iraqis are internally displaced.
Bishop Elizondo specifically cited the plight of religious minorities fleeing ISIS in both Syria and Iraq, particularly Christians. “It is clear that religious minorities, including Christians and Yazidis, are being targeted and need our moral and material support,” Bishop Elizondo said. “The goal of ISIS is to eliminate these minorities from the region, a goal which should be strongly opposed and defeated.”
Bishop Elizondo cited steps the United States could take to assist the suffering, including an increase in resettlement opportunities for the most vulnerable refugees and additional assistance to displaced populations. To date, the United States has resettled less than 1,000 Syrian refugees.
“These refugees are themselves victims of terror and deserve protection. Our nation must take leadership in protecting them so that the rest of the world follows suit,” Bishop Elizondo concluded. 

Leggi tutto!
 

Erbil refugee camp prioritizes education


The ongoing rise of the Islamic State (IS) in Iraq and Syria and the highly unstable security situation in these countries have resulted in the movement of more than 1.5 million internally displaced people and refugees fleeing into the more secure Iraqi Kurdistan.
As camps grew last year, often sheltering people in appalling conditions, one man decided to welcome hundreds of displaced families in his own way: by giving their children the best education he can in a region where many refugees struggle to meet their most basic needs. Father Douglas al-Bazi, the manager of the Mar Elia camp, told Al-Monitor, “We lost the battle, not the war. My generation? We are the losers, but we can provide a future to our kids.”
Inside a crowded library, a young girl sitting on a white leatherette sofa starts playing Christmas songs on her guitar. Next to her, her friend practices his violin skills before his afternoon lesson. “I love this machine,” said Rwaid, a 14-year-old boy from Qaraqosh, an Assyrian town in northern Iraq. “There was nothing like this in my old city,” he said, gripping the instrument that he now plays every day. He wants to become a musician.
When Bazi first opened the gates of the Mar Elia Chaldean church to more than 500 displaced Christians, the lot surrounding his office was nothing but grass and mud. Today, 120 white caravans are nestled around a large playground with a volleyball court, Ping-Pong tables and swings. Near the entrance, in front of two classrooms, the library offers board games like “Baghdad Monopoly,” musical instruments and a wide range of books, including Jules Verne's “Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea” and Alexandre Dumas’ “The Three Musketeers” in their original languages.
In his camp, which he calls a “center” and where refugees are called “relatives,” Bazi believes that education is the only way he can save his youngest guests from their traumas. “Believe me, IS’ next generation will be from our side [Christians] or from the Yazidis’ side,” Bazi said. “When the kids arrived here, they were completely lost for the first two weeks, angry and selfish. I remember the first time we offered them toys; within five minutes they destroyed them all. … Our kids, if they don’t have education, if they don’t have someone to look after them, do you think they are going to work for NASA? I don’t think so. It’s easy for IS to thrive among abandoned people.”
The camp, with its focus on education, seems out of place when compared to the dozens of other camps built in Iraqi Kurdistan when IS seized several cities in northern Iraq during the summer of 2014, including Mosul, Qaraqosh and Sinjar.
Baharka, situated just a few kilometers away from Mar Elia, shelters nearly 4,000 displaced Iraqis, mainly coming from Mosul, in dust-covered tents. There, only one in two children aged between 6 and 11 attend school. Even in Darashakran, a camp for Syrian refugees that Baharka camp manager Ahmad Abdo describes as “five-star,” the rate of school enrollment continues to decline due to pressure from families to send their children to work.
It’s one of the best camps,” said Nissan, a 58-year-old father of six who arrived in Mar Elia from Qaraqosh in the back of an oil truck 10 months ago. “I visited another camp, but it was too crowded. Almost 400 families were living there. It’s better here because we are with our neighbors; everyone knows each other. In other camps, there is no education, no libraries, no organized trips or music and English courses. Only here,” he added. “Jealousy exists. In the other camps, they say we have everything.”
Mar Elia, situated in the Christian neighborhood of Ankawa, regularly receives generous contributions, often in the form of goods like cinema tickets, plasma TVs and even caravans. These gifts from private donors are a scarce commodity in a region flooded with refugees and internally displaced people. The Baharka camp, mainly funded by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees and the World Food Program, has so far failed to find non-public supporters, even though it shelters six times more people than Mar Elia.
“It’s very difficult to find them; we are searching,” Abdo said. “Camps in Ankawa do better than the others; I don’t know why,” he added, confirming that competition for funding can be rough between the camps.
With his clean and tidy site that regularly attracts donors, Bazi said he hasn’t made any friends among the other camp managers in the region, as they don’t understand how he can spend so much money on so few. “They tell me, ‘What are you doing? People are dying, looking for food and medicine, and you are looking for books.’ But I don’t accept these remarks, never. I lived my whole life in Baghdad. At that time, people were looking for food and medicine. No one cared about education. But here, we do,” said the priest, who saw his church bombed and was kidnapped when he was still living in the capital.
“It’s not empty stomachs that destroyed my country; it’s empty minds,” he added, pointing his finger to his forehead.
For the summer, Bazi wants to expand the range of courses his camp has to offer, including Spanish and Italian classes. When asked if his project was long-term, Bazi replied that even though he never shares his opinion with his guests, he was prepared for the eventuality that they would stay “at least 15 years.”

Leggi tutto!

lunedì, giugno 22, 2015

 

‘We Will Not Forget Those Who Helped Us’

By National Catholic Register
Father Benedict Kiely

A U.S. priest gives firsthand account of the plight of Christian refugees in Erbil, Iraq.

Dust covers your clothes and sticks in your throat as you drive into the abandoned sports complex, which now houses more than 120,000 Christians, mainly Syriac Catholic, Chaldean Catholic and Syriac Orthodox, who fled after being driven from their homes last summer by the Islamic State (ISIS). This refugee camp, the Brazilian Sports Center, as it is known, is on the outskirts of Ankawa, the Christian section of the Kurdish capital, Erbil.
The men sit around idly, as they are not able to find work. But there are glimmers of hope: The children are trying to study, proudly carrying their schoolbooks and practicing their English on me, with beautiful smiles.
From the very first moment I arrived in Erbil, Iraq, one thing became abundantly clear: The situation is far more complicated than our sound-bite culture or a 60-second news report would allow.
These Christians, and other religious minorities, are victims of a wider regional conflict between the Shiite and Sunni Muslims. Further, many reports about the effectiveness and support the Kurdish government is providing to the Christians appear quite different after speaking with those directly affected.
Although I asked many questions, the real value was in listening to stories from women religious, priests and ordinary families. It was truly humbling to see, in the 21st century, families giving everything just because they are followers of Jesus of Nazareth. When the Islamic State (ISIS) appeared in their ancient Christian cities and villages, where families have lived since before Islam even existed, they were given three options: Convert to Islam, pay the exorbitant tax on Christians or die.
Their homes were marked with the Arabic “N” for Nasarean or Nasrani, identifying them as Christians. My driver and translator, Yohanna (John), had been a professor of political science in Mosul, Iraq; his family owned a successful farm. ISIS occupied the farm, kidnapped his brother and told them to leave. Miraculously, his brother escaped, and they left everything behind, with only the clothes they were wearing — all this because of their faith in Christ.
Everyone I met, including the Dominican nuns of Mosul, had similar stories. These highly educated women fled with just the habits they were wearing. Later, in Erbil, Sister Nazik, a young nun who has a Ph.D. from Oxford University, was telephoned by ISIS: They had found her mobile number in the convent and were demanding to know where the sisters had “hidden the guns.” Needless to say, Sister Nazik refused to speak to them.
The moving, often harrowing stories of Christian refugees clarified why I had decided to come to Erbil, despite the dangers of the journey.
A few weeks before my scheduled departure from my little parish in Stowe, Vt., a suicide attack had occurred by the U.S. Consulate in Ankawa, Erbil. My traveling companion decided it was too dangerous to go — and a senior figure in the U.S. administration advised against the journey.
Friends, family and parishioners asked why I was putting myself in danger. I knew it was not a desire for excitement or adventure, or even martyrdom. In fact, the inspiration for this trip was far simpler: It was a mission from the Lord, to see the actual situation on the ground, to meet the Church authorities and establish the needs and to ensure that the help already sent by so many agencies was being used.
My journey was the culmination of a pilgrimage that began almost a year ago.
Like so many, I was shocked and moved, last summer, when I heard of the fall of Mosul, Iraq’s second largest city to ISIS. This region, including the Nineveh Plain, has been the home of the Christian community since the time of the apostles.
The Kurdish forces have offered the most effective resistance to ISIS militants. And so tens of thousands of Christians and other minorities, notably the Yazidis, have arrived in Erbil. They live on the streets and in unfinished buildings — in the heat of summer and the freezing temperatures of winter. Many are now living in what they call “containers,” the kind of portable cabins often used here for temporary office space on a construction site.
The Christian refugees are making the very best of a bad situation, but for how long? Moved by their situation, I decided last summer to try to do something to help them, however small — reminded of the Lord’s words that even a cup of water given to a disciple will not be forgotten; important to remember when so many of us feel we are helpless and can do nothing.
Helped by community members in my parish, we founded Nasarean.org — to produce bracelets, lapel pins and car magnets marked with the Arabic “N.” By wearing these items, we remember to pray for them. Confronted with this tragedy, we need to show our solidarity and spur conversations when people ask the meaning of the symbol.
Lastly, all the proceeds from the donations for the items are sent directly to Aid to the Church in Need, a papal agency directly helping the Christians in Iraq and Syria.
What is the future for these brave Christian families who are our brothers and sisters in Christ? How can we forget that it was on the road to Damascus, in Syria, that St. Paul was converted, when Jesus did not say, “Why are you persecuting my Church,” but, “Why are you persecuting me?”
The priests who are running the camps try to put on a brave face for their people and assure them that, soon, they will return home. Privately, most tell me they see emigration as the only possibility.
In fact, I was in Erbil just after the fall of Ramadi, which had terrified the people, because there is nowhere else for them to find shelter if Erbil were to fall. Unfortunately, current U.S. policy is making it extremely difficult to even begin the process of emigration.
“Do you have a message for American Catholics?” I asked one of the Dominican nuns.
She told me, “Please tell them how lucky they are to pray in peace, and please ask them to pray for us. For when we pray for each other, we see each other — we are family.”
We must do more than pray. I am haunted by the words of one of the priests running a camp in Erbil: “We will not forget those who helped us. We will not forget those who kept silent.”

Father Benedict Kiely, the pastor of Blessed Sacrament Church in Stowe, Vermont, is the founder of Nasarean.org, which raises funds for Aid to the Church in Need to help persecuted Christians in Iraq.


Leggi tutto!

This page is powered by Blogger. Isn't yours?